Some more routes for your bicycle touring adventures in South Korea

After having recently described your easy way across Korea on a bicycle, namely from the Incheon Airport to Busan, here’s a few more routes you may want to consider after completing the Incheon-Busan ride. These rides are off the beaten track, umm, bike path. I find them way more interesting than riding on dedicated, straight, flat bike paths all the time but yes, there may be climbs, wider roads and whatnot. The routes do avoid busy roads and ugly climbs most of the time though, so yes, you can do them if you managed Seoul-Busan on the bike path.

Munsan-Sokcho — DMZ and the mountains of Gangwondo

DMZStarting at the Munsan subway station, this route touches the DMZ (bring your passport if you want to add an extra half day to go into the DMZ and see the tunnels) and brings you over the eastern mountain range of Gangwondo down into Sokcho. You’ll ride up towards Seoraksan on a very scenic, deserted road. So do bring your camera along! Up north, Korea is relatively deserted. I rode this during Mid-Autumn festival and had no problems finding motels and restaurants, but I recommend you do plan ahead a bit in case you are planning to spend the nights in other places than I did. Here’s the GPX file for the ride, I did it in the following intervals:

1 Munsan-Cheorwon 97km
2 Cheorwon-Hwacheon 87km
3 Hwacheon-Wontong 89km
4 Wontong-Sokcho 51km

Sokcho-Busan — Along the east coast

EastCoastThis route may well be my favourite. It’s relatively flat and provides quite a variety of sights. The landscape as well as the civilization changes along the way. Starting in the cooler north, heading further south where the climate gets warmer and with it the houses change, down to the south with its industrial cities and related wealth.
The Korean government is planning to build a bike path along the coast, I’d therefore recommend to do this route as soon as possible before the herds of cyclists come over — here’s the GPX file of the route on road. One option could be to ride it in 5 days as I did, but since there’s quite some population along the whole coast, you’ll certainly find accommodation in other areas as well.

1 Sokcho-Okgye 103km
2 Okgye-Uljin 100km
3 Uljin-Pohang 136km
4 Pohang-Ulsan 92km
5 Ulsan-Busan 82km

Busan-Haenam — The wrinkly part of the country

SouthCoastThis ride is a bit more tricky; the south coast consists of a lot of bays, islands and is criss-crossed by highways you can’t ride on. If you tried to ride all along the coast you’d probably have to go some 1000km (no, I didn’t measure it). So on this tour, I took some shortcuts and cheated a bit (namely took a train at the end of day 4). Still, the ride was worth, especially Namhae and Wando are areas well worth visiting. Here’s again the ride’s GPX file and my itin:

1 Busan-Masan 94km
2 Masan-Samcheon 95km
3 Samcheon-Namhae 70km
4 Namhae-Gwangyang 52km
5 Boseong-Wando 92km
6 Wando-Haenam 87km

Jeju-do

This last suggestion is really a no-brainer. Some 230km around the island, all flat. By spring 2014 the bike path is supposed to be completed, but even before that there is already a bike path along road 1132 which island. The island is speckled with motels, pensions and hotels, so you can spend the night at any place you like. Camp sites are also avail, btw, in case you want to use the opportunity of a flat terrain and haul your camping gear along.
Getting to Jeju (from Seoul) is fairly simple as well. There are all the flights plus, my favorite, there’s an over-night car ferry from Incheon airport. Push your bike onto the ferry at 8pm, eat, drink and sleep on the boat and arrive in Jeju around 7am, ready to ride. Same routine on the way back — especially convenient if you have all your camping gear with you.

No GPX file for you to follow (since it’s really dead-simple), just one advise: Do the ride counter-clockwise, Ie keep the sea at your right shoulder. Doing it this way, you will have the wind in your back more frequently plus you will be on the correct side of the road to see more of the beaches (there won’t however be many cars on the road to begin with…).

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6 thoughts on “Some more routes for your bicycle touring adventures in South Korea

  1. Pingback: Across Korea on a bicycle — a HOWTO for the foreigner riding Seoul-Busan and coming back in one piece | hajo

  2. We have been using your routes and they work wonders! Thank you so much! The DMZ route is astounding– the roads are not busy through scenic areas. We love it so much! Thanks!!!

    • Happy to hear you enjoyed it! 🙂 Yes, Seoraksan is a beauty. BTW, I hear the east coast bike path is about completed, it runs all the way up to the DMZ. I also liked the scenery in the north and the way it changed the further down south you went. Just in case you haven’t done the route yet…

  3. I will ride Seoul to Busan and this route looks more interesting than the national “rivers” route. Thanks for the heads up and thank you for the gpx files!

    A couple of questions if you have the time; did you attempt wild camping along the way and did riding so close to the DMZ cause any problems with the authorities?

    • There’s a band along the DMZ that is blocked off, there are checkpoints on roads that you won’t be able to pass. No issue with authorities, the soldiers will tell you friendly that you can’t go further. I had to back-track twice because of that, have erased those “dead-ends” from the GPX. I.e. if you follow the GPX you won’t get in contact with them.
      Koreans love to camp wild along streams. No issue. Open fires are also common there. But wild camping in the woods is uncommon. If you keep a low profile it isn’t an issue at all, done it myself. If you camp on private ground better bring some bottles of alc and have them with the owner 😉

      And yes, personally I found the river path the most boring of all. Relatively speaking.

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