Driving a Mahindra Ssangyong

RX7

I’ve been living in a building carrying the name Ssangyong. That was ok, albeit it brought on an interesting episode with a flooded apartment plus 5 units below mine being really flooded.

This time it’s about the car. It claims to be built upon the previous Mercedes Benz ML class. Maybe. Then Ssangyong went bankrupt and got acquired by Mahindra. Of India. Where I live now. And needed a car once I arrived here.

Yup, I chose a Mahindra Ssangyong Rexton RX7. Considered a luxurious vehicle back in Korea. Considered very luxurious over here. My first two days with it were pretty inspiring:

– The mechanical steering wheel height adjustment only works if you rattle the wheel real hard to unlock the lever
– The 3rd row seats have no head rests. Safety galore!
– The 2nd row center seat belt is not 3-point but old-style 2-point. Not the retracting 2-point but just the “belt tangle loose, adjust it manually or not” 2-belt. Very classic style, haven’t seen this for some 20 years…
– Not too sure what to make of the fact that the (beige) interior is pretty grey and black in places and the vehicle has some 120km on the odometer upon delivery. Maybe normal for India…

Day 3 the adventures start:
– Audio system remote controls in the steering wheel don’t work
– When the vehicle is parked, engine off, you can’t switch the gear lever from P to R/N/D. Of course, that’s how it’s supposed to be! But — you CAN move the lever half way towards R. Enough to unlock the gearbox lock, the vehicle starts rolling away!
– Diesel consumption is some 17l/100km(!)

Good thing I have a driver 🙂 I send him back to the dealer to fix the stuff. He comes back half a day later reporting success:
– They disassembled the steering wheel, assembled it again. Half the remote buttons work, the other half doesn’t.
– The gear box issue will solve itself after some 500km, the dealer’s sales guy (!) claims
– The same sales guy says the gas consumption will improve once “the carbon settles in the engine” after some 1000km…

After some e-mail exchange with Mahindra themselves, a customer relationship manager of the dealer contacts me. Meanwhile I figure out that the cruise control doesn’t work. Neither does the rear washer. Some 3 weeks into the life of the shiny new Mahindra Ssangyong, it goes back to the dealer again. And comes back the same day:
– The cruise control got fixed. Yay! 🙂
– The rear washer washes. Yay yay! 🙂
– The steering wheel remote buttons work, yay! (for now…)
– The gear box gets “inspected”, “adjusted” and the topic reported to Mahindra. The “adjustment” now allows the shift lever to be moved into reverse gear without the brake being engaged! yay 😦

Well, let’s wait and see what Mahindra thinks about the gear box. Then, it’s now some 6 weeks into the life of the poor vehicle, the daytime temperature in Bangalore slowly rises. To a point where the aircon of the car could come in handy. Yes, you guessed it… So I ask for an update on the gear box issue and mention that the aircon is sub-par. After a very swift response by the dealer, it is agreed that the dealer sends a driver to pick up the vehicle for “repair”. The driver arrives on time and is friendly, like all their staff, I must admit… So the vehicle goes away again. A few hours later a call comes in:
– The dealer’s driver reports “slow pickup” (read: poor acceleration). Yes I noticed earlier but didn’t bother, this is a SUV and not a Porsche… Anyway, the dealer proposes to fix it but we agree to defer to a later point since it’d take some 2 days and:
– the gear box “got inspected again and the case re-reported to Mahindra”
– The gas of the aircon got refilled and I’m liable to a charge of some 800Rupees (about 10 Euro) — with the vehicle having a 2 years warranty. Not that 10 Euro would hurt much, but what’s the point of a warranty when the factory can’t fill the aircon?

Meanwhile 9 weeks into the life of the goo’old clunker, word comes in from the dealer that Mahindra advises the change of a certain part to fix the gearbox issue. Yay! Almost the same day, I’m innocently driving and want to mute my radio by the button at the steering wheel to, surprise, figure out that the remote control buttons fail to work again. 3rd time! That makes me have a closer look at the wheel. Weird, I think, I have to hold it pointing left to have the vehicle go straight. Bloody mechanic who “fixed” the buttons earlier, must have had a twisted look when he reassembled the wheel…
Good thing though you only notice those things when you drive yourself. I consider myself lucky to have a driver, so I don’t see these flaws every day. But then, when my driver drives, I love to sit on the passenger seat. My fault entirely then, as the passenger seat unfortunately came loose during the last 2 weeks. No fun to get thrown around as your driver corners with a misaligned wheel 😦

Meanwhile the vehicle has done some 2500km, still gulps 17l/100km and I’m awaiting yet another reply from the dealer. I’m going to meet the head of R&D Mahindra next week down in Chennai — not because of my vehicle but for business reasons. I was thinking of driving down there but instead opted for a flight since driving would have meant sitting in a vehicle for 5hrs with 36deg C outside while it’s 32deg C inside with the aircon at full power. Not happening; I’m instead seriously thinking whether I should give him the URL of this post…

4 weeks later, a guy from Mahindra recently called me and said that this time, while the garage does the “repairs”, he will be around to make sure everything goes well. Well — the car is back from repair now, with, according to them, “all fixed”. Strange then that the gearbox lever still has the same fault, the steering wheel buttons still don’t work and the passenger seat still rattles… Good thing I can’t see any change with the “pick up”, I have hope that they didn’t even touch it.

I have decided to give up. The car is leased for 2 years, it’ll go back to the leasing company after that time and all is over for me. I will just take away that I will never, never ever in my life touch a Mahindra or Ssangyong vehicle again. Ever. Recommend those clunkers to your worst enemies…

Next up: My experience with the Kenwood Multimedia/Navigation unit that came installed in a Mahindra/Ssangyong Rexton RX7 in India.