White balance

If you are taking photos with a digital camera — duh, who doesn’t, these days? — spend 5 minutes and read the following about white balance. I’m sure it’ll make these weird colors turn so much better…

In a nutshell, you don’t have to fiddle with white balance all the time. With modern cameras, automatic white balance is good most of the time. But there are times where it just doesn’t work well. And by then it’s good to know what options you have up your sleeve…

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Star trails

Night photography was always sort of a favorite of mine; dark backgrounds plus some sort of illumination almost guarantees great looks. Nowadays, DSLRs have reached a price-performance range where one can achieve things previously even very difficult with film cameras.

If you can’t sleep at night or are planning a night away from civilization (read away from stray light) then consider bringing your camera and tripod along! Have a look at this article written by Floris van Breugel for a comprehensive guide on how to achieve some spectacular star-trail shots. His examples speak for themselves!

Meanwhile, I’m out in the countryside, camera in tow!

Hold those young horses…

It’s been just a tad over 3 months now that I had a rather unfriendly encounter with something on a skiing slope. Can’t remember details but from the doc’s assessment some 12hrs and an odyssey through Korea later, I must assume that that something was very solid and me moving rather quickly at the time of impact.

Anyway, while my completely shattered ankle bone had 2 surgeries, a perceived ton of steel bars and screws plus 3 months of time to heal, my 6 fractured ribs, deflated lung and ruptured spleen had enough time to catch on. Merely laying and sitting around during all the time also had the beneficial effect of my leg muscles being able to take an extended rest while my mind had the pleasure to enjoy the beautiful sounds and colors only medically prescribed opiates can induce. A lengthy rest for my leg muscles to a degree where they somewhere along the way decided that they are no longer required. They hence vanished (probably into one of these empty wine bottles which somehow materialized and dematerialized next to my couch all the time) turning my legs into something a toothpick would call anorexic. My muscles had great support from my Doc during all this time, he told me not to do any exercise whatsoever since it may interfere with bone healing.

But now, the 3 months and a tad are over. And today was the great day where I visited the doc again. He looked at the X-Ray of my anorexic toothpick and declared that the bone is almost completely healed. And that, effective immediately, I could put my crutches into a corner and just walk out of the hospital on my toothpick. Simple as that. He even proved me by asking me to take a few steps without crutches. I didn’t collapse! Well, at least not during the first half of the first step, that is.

I have today understood the real problem with the modern health care system. It’s all these unnecessary physiotherapists that inflate health care costs. Send them into a toothpick factory! Or just ask them to manufacture and deliver aforementioned opiates to the public. Humanity would leapfrog!

On a loosely related note, I have made an appointment with PT for immediately after the weekend. I’ll show these guys how useless they are!

More on photography

So you may have seen my earlier post encouraging you to get beyond the ordinary point-and-shoot photo taking and read up a bot on some beginner’s tutorials on photography.
Did you read the tutorials and are longing for more? Or were the tutorials too simple, since you knew all that stuff already? In any case, may I recommend you have a closer look at Ed Knepley’s photography blog? He’s creating new, interesting content almost daily as I write this and previously he published a very interesting series of photography tutorials around a concept he calls the 4 Cs. He covers a pretty wide field and also links to others where appropriate. Go check it out, the easiest way to read it in a structured manner is probably by starting from his Table of contents. And, PS, be prepared to get stuck in it for a long time 🙂